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About Malta

Malta is packed with attractions and places of interest.

Malta may only measure a compact 27km by 14km, but the tiny island nation is crammed with splendid sights, from 5000-year-old temples to spine-tinglingly beautiful lagoons and rock formations. map[1]Malta’s size makes it a breeze to get around, so it’s possible to base yourself in one place and visit all the top attractions as a series of day trips.

The average annual temperature is 18–19 °C (64–66 °F) making it one of the highest results in Europe; around 22 °C (72 °F) during the day and 15 °C (59 °F) at night.  In January, the coldest month, the temperature ranges from 12 to 20 °C (54 to 68 °F) during the day and 7 to 15 °C (45 to 59 °F) at night.  In  August, the warmest month, the temperature ranges from 28 to 34 °C (82 to 93 °F) during the day and 19 to 24 °C (66 to 75 °F) at night. Large fluctuations in temperature are rare.average-temperature-malta

The capital city of Valletta host to regular plays and concerts, as well as scores of exhibitions and street events. The Museum of Archaeology in Valletta houses an exceptionally rich collection of prehistoric artefacts. The War Museum at Fort St. Elmo is home to a Sunday military parade in period costumes re-enactment and the capital also possesses the impressive Grand Master’s Palace and St. John’s Co-cathedral. With 7,000 years of history, the sites to visit are endless – Megalithic temples, underground catacombs, churches and forts are not to be missed. Interactive walkthrough and multimedia attractions offer an overview of Malta’s history in under an hour. They’re interesting and a great way to learn the significance of what visitors will later be looking at. ????????????????????????????????????The Museum of Roman Antiquities and various other sites are found in Rabat. The Cathedral and its museum in the fortified medieval city of Mdina, right next door to Rabat, are not to be missed, For a romantic stroll like no other, wander the lamp lit streets of Mdina at night. Don’t miss the renowned chocolate cake at Fontanella Tea rooms, situated right on the bastion with a spectacular view. For those who love art, the possibilities are endless – visit the impressive collection at the National Museum of Fine Arts, see the Caravaggio’s Beheading of St. John at St. John’s co-Cathedral and visit medieval Palazzo Falson in Mdina with its collection of antiques. To view more contemporary work, walk around the exhibits at the St. John’s Cavalier Art Centre. Children will enjoy activity and fun parks, which include the original movie set where Popeye was filmed. The rural side of the Islands is fascinating, with charming villages & captivating folklore. And on Sunday morning, go to the fishing village of Marsaxlokk, the open-air market outside Valletta or the It-Tokk  market in Victoria, Gozo.

87703d8a395959cf7d02b137fa8973f4There are places in which to live it up and others where it seems like time stood still. In Malta you can enjoy life at its simplest one day and at its most cosmopolitan the next. However short your stay, it’s possible to have a taste of island life in a variety of settings – from traditional villages to urban resorts.

Malta’s capital, the World Heritage City of Valletta, and the medieval fortified towns of Mdina and Cittadella in Gozo, are the Islands’ historical highlights. Tas-Sliema, Bugibba, Qawra and St. Julian’s in Malta and Marsalforn and Xlendi in Gozo are the main resorts. They bustle with activity, and not just in summer. Valletta is a treasurehouse of art and architecture. This city of the Knights remains virtually intact, its streets flanked by palaces and tiny, old-world shops. Across Grand Harbour lie the Three Cities of Senglea, Cospicua and Vittoriosa. Older than Valletta, they offer a fascinating insight into the islands’ maritime fortunes. The southern fishing village of Marsaxlokk and neighbouring resort town of Marsascala are also worth a visit. With little effort, just a desire to explore, you’ll find inland towns and villages with character and treasures of their own. Churches reveal masterpieces by the artists to the Knights while each village square is a slice of history, its café-bar the hub of authentic rural life.